Mental retardation in american society

American association of people with disabilities

Geoffrey Reaume's enlightening essay on sheltered workshops in Ontario from the s to gives a voice to people with disabilities and uncovers troubling, unresolved issues about sheltered workshops. Two of the chapters trace the "racialized" views of Caucasian superiority in the classification of Down syndrome as "mongolism," and the eventual repudiation of this association with racial atavism. This would provide a richer perspective on what is means to be a person with intellectual disabilities in America. Feeble-mindedness is listed as "one of the several kinds of social inadequacy with which the state must deal" p. Adding to the richness of this history Penny Richard creatively uses midth century historical sources such as popular fiction and the words of parents who were known figures of the day to illustrate societal attitudes towards families in that era. In doing so, the reader uncovers the roots of contemporary issues and debates concerning intellectual disability today. The book is divided into five chronological parts, with each one beginning with one to two primary sources. Molly Ladd-Taylor's thought- provoking essay draws connections between the practice of sterilization and contemporary issues. Philip Ferguson's fascinating chapter on the rise of the almshouse, the precursor of the asylum, introduces economic factors and societal attitudes, such as the notions of the "deserving poor" and the "non-deserving poor," in explaining the role of the almshouse in the lives of persons with disabilities. Part I discusses the education and treatment of "idiots" before formal supports were available in the states. AAIDD advocates for the equality, dignity, and human rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and for their full inclusion and participation in society. Promote the development of a society that fully includes individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Trent Jr. As a journal with an applied focus, IDD provides a forum for the dissemination of rigorously reviewed, actionable information that is relevant to emerging policies, innovative practices, and transformative concepts.

Harry Laughlin's chapter demonstrates the chilling impact of the eugenics movement at the turn of the century in the promotion of sterilization as a method of reducing the number of persons with disabilities. These attitudes included blaming the families for the child's disability and viewing caring for a family member with a disability as a "sacred duty.

Part I discusses the education and treatment of "idiots" before formal supports were available in the states. The book is divided into five chronological parts, with each one beginning with one to two primary sources.

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Nicole Rafter addresses the early 20th century belief that individuals with intellectual disabilities had the intrinsic potential for criminal behavior.

Volume 1 through Volume 20, no.

american journal on mental retardation

This chapter is also unique in its depiction of the highly gendered attitudes to parents, with very different views of fathers. Influence positive attitudes and public awareness to contributions of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

history of the term mental retardation

Trent Jr. Two of the chapters trace the "racialized" views of Caucasian superiority in the classification of Down syndrome as "mongolism," and the eventual repudiation of this association with racial atavism.

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Mental Retardation in America: A Historical Reader.